Different Types of Distancing

Social, Physical and Others

Rahman Mohamed

Since 2020 began new words have entered daily conversation worldwide.  In English they include “quarantine”, “isolation”, and “distancing”.  Unknown to many there are different types of distancing.  Although measures to contain COVID-19 (Carona virus) include physical distancing, it has been named social distancing worldwide by Media, Political Leaders, and the World Health Organization (WHO).  So what is the difference between ‘Social’ and ‘Physical’ distancing?  How protective are each?

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Dementia, Delirium, Dyslexia

Not all D’s are the same
Rahman Mohamed

Dementia: an impairment in how you think that can effect your social function

Delirium: a state of confusion related to a medical treatment

Dyslexia: a process in the brain that makes it harder for a person to understand written information

Dementia, delirium and dyslexia all have an effect of how a person thinks and expresses.  They have similarities but are not the same. Continue reading

You’re Not Alone in Feeling Alone

A spreading health problem: loneliness.
Rahman Mohamed

In the UK Prime Minister Theresa May created the “Minister of Loneliness”.  Studies suggest that loneliness can be as unhealthy as smoking 15 cigarettes a day.  Loneliness can be not being with another person.  For some loneliness is a way of life, working from an apartment and living without a roommate.

Others experience loneliness because of isolation – cut off from other people.  Some who is around or with other people but is separated and feels loneliness.  It can be physical isolation, not having anyone to be with because of where you are.  Even though you’re in a packed office you’re cut off from everyone because you’re in a cubicle.  Because the bathrooms are private the only place you talk to co-workers is at the water fountain or while you’re in line for the bathroom.  When commuting anywhere you’re on public transit and not with someone you know.

Isolation loneliness is also experienced because of exclusion, not with others because they don’t want you with them, aka the high school popularity effect that leaves you alone to suffer loneliness.  Someone who lives in Canada but doesn’t drink and know how to play hockey is left out of the weekly Saturday bar night when people talk about their week, plans, and themselves, not just Nazim Kadri and how he’s playing against Montreal. Continue reading